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Talk (West) [clear filter]
Thursday, August 11
 

9:00am MDT

Opening Remarks
Thursday August 11, 2016 9:00am - 9:10am MDT
West

9:10am MDT

Poster Previews
Thursday August 11, 2016 9:10am - 9:45am MDT
West

9:50am MDT

Calorie Intake: A Cornerstone of Ancestral Health
Traditional cultures generally have a low burden of obesity, metabolic, and cardiovascular diseases. In contrast, affluent cultures have a high burden of obesity, metabolic, and cardiovascular diseases. Why? Traditional cultures eat widely varying diets, yet they all have one thing in common: they don’t eat as many calories as we do, relative to their calorie needs. We’ve always known that calorie intake impacts health, but emerging evidence is suggesting that it may be even more important than we realized. In fact, it may be the single most important determinant of chronic disease risk in affluent cultures today.

Presenters
avatar for Stephan Guyenet

Stephan Guyenet

PhD
Stephan Guyenet is an obesity researcher and neurobiologist who places cutting-edge biomedical research into an ancestral health framework. His research spans neurodegenerative disease, aging, nutrition, and obesity, but in recent years has been focused primarily on the neurobiology... Read More →


Thursday August 11, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am MDT
West

10:40am MDT

Diet and cognition: Data, theory, and some solutions from the playbook of psychology
In addition to its effects on physical wellbeing, diet also plays a major role in mood, cognition, and psychological wellbeing. I first summarize my recent empirical work on the detrimental effects of a refined, low-fat diet on cognition in the rat. In addition to its obesogenic properties, this diet causes deficits in motivation, attention, and impulse control. Next I will place this research in the greater context of psychological theory and phenomena. Key concepts from psychology offer many insights into the modern diet-related health problems. I will touch on concepts such as Super-Normal stimuli, Pavlovian conditioning, delay discounting, learned helplessness, overshadowing and blocking, the addictive-like nature of junk foods, habit learning, and endocrine dysregulation by chronic stress. But all hope is not lost. I conclude with some solutions psychology can offer to rescue us from diet-induced problems.

Presenters
avatar for Aaron Blaisdell

Aaron Blaisdell

Faculty, UCLA
Dr. Blaisdell is a UCLA Professor of Psychology, and members of the UCLA Brain Research Institute, Integrative Center for Learning and Memory, and the Evolutionary Medicine Interdisciplinary Center. He runs the comparative cognition lab (http://pigeonrat.psych.ucla.edu). He is Editor-in-Chief... Read More →


Thursday August 11, 2016 10:40am - 11:20am MDT
West

11:30am MDT

Is There One Truly Optimal, Universally Foundational Human Diet: Bio-individuality as a Secondary and not a Primary Issue
The many varied dietary approaches of our Paleolithic ancestors throughout the eons of our evolutionary history have superficially suggested that an optimal human diet can be highly varied and is largely subject to "bio-individual differences". But is this truly the case? The work of certain nutritional pioneers reveals that this may not in fact be the case, and that the details of any given dietary approach—though not entirely irrelevant--are less important than certain fundamental foundations we all share. This presentation will explore the many ways in which our seemingly diverse human population is far more alike than unalike, and where we need to prioritize foundational needs versus bio-individual needs and polymorphisms.

Presenters
avatar for Nora Gedgaudas

Nora Gedgaudas

CNS, NTP, BCHN, Northwest Neurofeedback Inc
Nora Gedgaudas, CNS, NTP, BCHN, is the author of the international best-selling book, Primal Body, Primal Mind. She is also the author of the top-selling ebook: Rethinking Fatigue: What Your Adrenals Are Really Telling You and What You Can Do About It. Nora is an experienced nutritional... Read More →


Thursday August 11, 2016 11:30am - 12:10pm MDT
West

1:40pm MDT

The Global Sustainability-Nutrition Disconnect
Many countries try to tackle the issue of environmental sustainability while designing their dietary guidelines. Working off assumptions and poor research, dietary recommendations vary greatly when viewed with an ancestral lens. For example, some countries advise the public to increase intake of highly processed soy-based proteins, while others recognize the detrimental effects soy can have on the environment. Cattle are largely vilified as both environmentally toxic and as dangerous as cigarettes to human health, however milk takes a front seat at America's "My Plate". Meanwhile, worldwide nutrition deficiencies, food insecurity and obesity issues are not going to be solved with more whole grains. This talk will review dietary policies of countries that are trying to include "sustainability" into their national dietary guidelines, and will illustrate the conflicts in their advice.

Presenters
avatar for Diana Rodgers

Diana Rodgers

Registered Dietitian, Producer, Sustainable Dish
Diana Rodgers, RD, LDN, NTP is a “real food” Licensed Registered Dietitian Nutritionist, and Nutritional Therapy Practitioner living on a working organic farm west of Boston. Diana has an active nutrition practice where she helps people get on track with diet and lifestyle... Read More →


Thursday August 11, 2016 1:40pm - 2:20pm MDT
West

2:30pm MDT

DOHaD: The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease
We are developing an increasing understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological basis for how our environment influences early human development, especially with regard to risk of later non-communicable disease. Disruptive processes, especially those which are evolutionarily novel, can lead to disease in later life. If the processes producing a propensity to the likes of obesity and insulin resistance are established in early life, then interventions in adults may come too late to be effective, especially at a population health level. This talk offers an introduction to the DOHaD concept and outlines the implications in holds, not only for health professionals, but among policymakers, opinion leaders, and the general public.

Presenters
avatar for Jamie Scott

Jamie Scott

PGDipSportExMed, PGDipNutMed, Ancestral Health Society of New Zealand
Vice-President, The Ancestral Health Society of New Zealand. Jamie Scott holds postgraduate qualifications in Sport and Exercise Medicine, and in Nutrition Medicine, as well as undergraduate degrees in Human Nutrition, and in Exercise Science. He is the co-founder of the AHSNZ... Read More →


Thursday August 11, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm MDT
West

3:20pm MDT

Paleolithic diets and kidney diseases
Kidney function generally decreases as people age, and independent of age, diet can contribute to common kidney diseases in many ways. Typical American diets can promote obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and kidney stones. All of these factors promote additional damage to the kidney and further decline in renal function. Paleo-type diets, as compared to Mediterranean or DASH-like diets , improve blood sugar and lipid control, and lower diet acid intake and urine calcium excretion. In our presentation, we will review evidence available from clinical trials comparing dietary treatments for prevention and/or treatment of kidney stones and chronic kidney disease.

Presenters
avatar for Lynda Frassetto

Lynda Frassetto

MD, UCSF
Lynda Frassetto, MD, is Professor Emeritus of Medicine in the Division of Nephrology at the University of California, San Francisco (USCF).  She grew up in the greater New York metropolitan area and attended college and medical school in Connecticut.  She trained as a nephrologist... Read More →


Thursday August 11, 2016 3:20pm - 4:00pm MDT
West

4:10pm MDT

Fatty Acids in Obesity and Disease: The Case Against Being a Fat Burner
Popular in paleo and low-carb communities is the goal of becoming a "fat burner," or having access to adipocyte-stored fat released as free fatty acids for energy. This has been shown anecdotally and clinically to be an effective weight loss strategy, but there are disease implications concerning this metabolic state and it's use for weight loss. I will present my research and that of others showing PUFA and other fatty acids relation to obesity, type II diabetes and overall metabolism. Research challenging sugars as a cause of obesity will also be presented. The state of lipolysis and free fatty acid use, and the physiological changes that go along with it, will be compared to disease states. PUFA specifically, and other fatty acids generally, contribute to degenerative disease at several levels, and I will make the case that being a fat-burner in the low carb sense is necessarily accompanied by physiological changes both that mimic and cause disease at the cellular and organismal levels.

Presenters
avatar for Kyle Mamounis

Kyle Mamounis

PhD
Kyle J. Mamounis, B.S., is a doctoral candidate in the nutritional science department of Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey USA. His primary research interest is investigating the effects of fatty acids on energy balance regulation. He maintains a science blog with posts... Read More →


Thursday August 11, 2016 4:10pm - 4:50pm MDT
West
 
Friday, August 12
 

9:00am MDT

Optimal Weaning from an Evolutionary Perspective
Infancy is a crucial time for brain growth, and this species-critical, rapid brain growth continues well past weaning. Therefore, the diet onto which evolving humans weaned their infants must have been highly selected to favour brain growth. Reviewing evidence from anthropology, reproductive biology, and infant physiology, we find a high-fat animal-based diet to be the most plausible weaning diet of our ancestors. Recent evidence from randomised controlled trials confirms that weaning onto animal foods best supports the intense brain growth of human infants even today.

Presenters
avatar for L. Amber O'Hearn

L. Amber O'Hearn

MS
L. Amber O'Hearn, MSc, is a nutrition writer and blogger. She researches the effects of dietary modifications on health biomarkers, with a special interest in diets that resemble those of our evolutionary past.


Friday August 12, 2016 9:00am - 9:40am MDT
West

9:50am MDT

The Human Milk-Oriented Microbiota: babies and beyond
A feature of the evolution of lactation is the explicit development of a symbiotic relationship between microbes and the mammalian host. This relationship is emerging as a key process of proper development. Human milk feeds and guides the colonization of the infant gut microbiota and nourishes the phenotypic state and metabolic processes of bacteria evolved to this unusual ecological niche. A milk-oriented microbiota (MOM) sets the infant up for a lifetime of health. The crosstalk between maternal milk and the infant gut has been the focus of research of an interdisciplinary and highly integrated team, the Milk Group, at UC Davis, for the past decade. We have used the insights gained from basic science research to steer the development of clinical solutions. Interestingly, one of the most abundant components of human milk, oligosaccharides, provides no direct nutritional support to the infant. Instead, we have shown that these complex sugars actually selectively promote the growth of beneficial bacteria in the gut while excluding potential pathogens. The specificity of this interaction is a key principle to understanding how the microbial ecology of the intestine goes wrong promoting conditions like irritable bowel syndrome in adults and necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants. We have utilized this paradigm in recent clinical trials with success. We have also begun using this paradigm to examine the gut microbiota-brain axis in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism.

Presenters
avatar for Megan Sanctuary

Megan Sanctuary

MS, PhD cand., University of California, Davis
Megan Sanctuary, MS, PhD candidate, is a student at the University of California, Davis. She is a member of the Milk Group that has been decoding mother’s milk for clues to lasting health for the past decade. She is currently using this basic science information to develop effective... Read More →


Friday August 12, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am MDT
West

10:40am MDT

Proprioception and Play: Were our Ancestors Better Behaved?
Play is an essential component of cognitive, physical, psychological, and social/emotional development. The healthy physical nature of play, and more specifically the proprioceptive aspects of play, are also contributing factors to independent self-regulation and the emergence of efficient adaptive skills. Evidence suggests that children of our distant ancestors engaged in significantly more ‘physical’ play than current generations. As such, the recent evolution of play skills demonstrates an alarming decrease in healthy physical play opportunities and therefore proprioceptive influences on self-regulation. Today's children often have difficulty developing coping skills and adaptive behaviors. As a result, academic performance, social skills, and self-regulation are affected. Proprioceptive input as an aspect of healthy play has declined significantly since our ancestors raised their young. The importance of proprioceptive play and strategies for naturally and organically increasing those opportunities for children will be discussed.

Presenters
avatar for Allyson Chrystal

Allyson Chrystal

MS, OTD, MOTR/L
Allyson Chrystal, OTD, OTR/L, is an occupational therapist and clinical instructor specializing in pediatrics. In her clinical work and research, Allyson has focused on sensory integration and self-regulation in children with behavioral and developmental disorders. More recently... Read More →


Friday August 12, 2016 10:40am - 11:20am MDT
West

11:30am MDT

Childhood Food Allergies: an Evolutionary Mismatch Hypothesis
Through placental transfer, breastfeeding, and the introduction of first solid foods, children are exposed to a wide range of food antigens. During the Plio-Pleistocene those early exposures would have matched the food antigen exposures expected over the remaining lifespan. With the advent of farming, long-distance trade, and the steady march of advancing technology, the potential for mismatch between early and late food antigen exposure has been increasing--slowly at first, and exponentially in the past few decades in countries where cuisine has rapidly become less and less insular. In turn, since the induction of immune system tolerance must be accomplished early in the lifespan, and since selection has accordingly honed the process to work best in the very young, each increase in the mismatch identified above is expected to produce a corresponding increase in childhood food allergies. Supporting evidence is presented.

Presenters
avatar for Paul Turke

Paul Turke

MD, PhD, Turke & Thomashow Pediatrics
As an anthropologist (Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1985) I helped to found the field of cooperative breeding in humans. I was a Fellow with the University of Michigan's Evolution and Human Behavior Program from 1986-1990, where I participated as one of the original four members... Read More →


Friday August 12, 2016 11:30am - 12:10pm MDT
West

1:50pm MDT

Pre-and Post-natal Retrognathia in Homo sapiens: An Evolutionary Perspective on a Modern, and Serious, Pediatric Health Problem
From an optimal evolutionary fitness perspective, the healthiest phenotype for the anatomically modern human (AMH) facial profile is prognathic for both the mandible and maxilla (i.e., maxilla and mandible both forward of the anterior cranial base). According to archived crania and mandibular specimens from museums worldwide, maxillo-mandibular prognathism (M-MP) had indeed been ubiquitous over the 200,000+ years of AMH's evolutionary history until around the time of the Industrial Revolution in the early 19th-Century when retro-gnathic profiles first became evident in the UK, western and northern Europe and North America . There are a few reasonable hypotheses for explaining this relatively sudden departure from AMH's healthy M-MP profile phenotype that are mostly predicated upon feeding strategy changes normally normally associated with transitioning of cultures from traditional Hunter-Gatherers to other forms of sustenance known to be associated with increased intensification of food processing (e.g., agrarian and/or industrialization). These hypotheses, with emphasis placed upon early infancy and childhood nursing and weaning patterns, will be developed in this discussion based largely upon evidence gathered from the Morton Crania Collection at the University of Pennsylvania's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology where the author is a Visiting Scholar; and implications for how these data support speculation that current orthodontic diagnosis, treatment and success criteria standards, are in need of revision will also be discussed.

Presenters
avatar for Kevin Boyd

Kevin Boyd

DDS, Dentistry for Children
Kevin Boyd is a Chicago Pediatric Dentist. He teaches in the residency program in Pediatric Dentistry at Lurie Children’s Hospital; he also serves as dental consultant to Lurie’s Sleep Medicine service. He is currently a Visiting Scholar at U. Pennsylvania doing research in the... Read More →


Friday August 12, 2016 1:50pm - 2:30pm MDT
West

4:10pm MDT

2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans: Irrelevant or Alarming--or Both?
Though the ancestral health community has typically opted out of following their recommendations, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) continue to expand their scope so that few Americans will be unaffected by them. The creation of the 2015 DGA generated considerable amounts of media attention, public awareness, and legislative activity, with familiar battles over red meat and saturated fat joined by larger concerns related to sustainable diets and scientific rigor. The uproar surrounding the 2015 DGA demonstrates how, paradoxically, they are increasingly irrelevant to many as nutrition guidance, while they continue to extend their reach into the lives of all Americans. This presentation summarizes the recent controversy, outlines how the 2015 policy compares to previous editions, and illustrates how new aspects of the policy demonstrate why the ancestral health community must take an active leadership role in resisting the expansion of DGA-based principles and practices into local workplaces and communities.

Presenters
avatar for Adele Hite

Adele Hite

PhD candidate, MPH, RD
Adele Hite is a PhD student in communication, rhetoric, and digital media at North Carolina State University, as well as a registered dietitian. She has master’s degrees in English and in nutrition and has pursued graduate studies in nutrition epidemiology. She is policy chair and... Read More →


Friday August 12, 2016 4:10pm - 4:50pm MDT
West
 
Saturday, August 13
 

9:00am MDT

Ancient Apothecary: Frankincense, Myrrh and other Tools to Mend the Modern Gut Against Opportunistic Phages, Fungi and Other Offenders
Some believe that Earth is in its sixth mass extinction event. The loss of diversity observed in the modern human gut may echo similar calamities in rain forests, coral reefs and rivers around the world. As vital portions of an ecosystem go blank or missing, tidal waves of change can occur. Expansion of opportunistic lifeforms into empty niches frequently lead to disease and havoc in frail ecosystems. The hallmark of modern gut health is missing mucosal protectors and overloaded phages, fungi and other opportunists. Since ancient times, plants were the first medicine to cure pain or alleviate digestive woes or skin maladies. Indeed, their properties may be magical for the modern microbiota. Aromatic resins of trees and shrubs such as frankincense and myrrh contain fatty acids and fiber which increase abundance of beneficial gut flora while being toxic to disease-associated polluters. Human clinical trials will be discussed. Employing the ancient apothecary as tools to mend the modern microbiome will be detailed.

Presenters
avatar for Grace Liu

Grace Liu

PharmD, AFMCP
Dr. Grace Liu, PharmD is a functional medicine practitioner with an international practice specializing in consulting, nutrigenomics, functional laboratory analysis, and personalized programs for executives and athletes. She helps rebuild biomes to restore vitality. In October 2016... Read More →


Saturday August 13, 2016 9:00am - 9:40am MDT
West

9:50am MDT

Refined Foods and The Gut Microbiota – A Toxic Mix?
The benefits of low-carbohydrate diets are finally receiving appropriate attention, however it must be borne in mind that some well-studied pre-industrial populations ate high-carbohydrate ancestral diets, yet still enjoyed exemplary metabolic health. This is a presentation of the hypothesis that altered host-bacterial interactions may be a key step in the initiation of obesity and diabetes, and are brought about by replacing life-derived ancestral foods that retain evolved structural properties with dense, processed alternatives. Such microbial-initiated inflammatory changes to the neuroregulation of appetite and metabolism would be directly analogous to the aberrant host responses that produce periodontitis, and may be triggered by the same foods – flours, grains and refined sugars. Dietary fats may play a role conveying microbial changes to the immune surveillance of the small intestine. The hypothesis would explain both the benefits of diets that displace processed foods and the correlation between oral and systemic health.

Presenters
avatar for Ian Spreadbury

Ian Spreadbury

PhD
Ian Spreadbury is a Canadian neuroscientist who argues that the effects of flour, sugar and processed foods on host-microbiota interplay may be the primary cause of obesity and many western diseases. After research positions at Bristol, Oxford, Calgary and Queen's, he is currently... Read More →


Saturday August 13, 2016 9:50am - 10:30am MDT
West

10:40am MDT

Do You Really Want A Hunter Gatherer Microbiota? Pearls and Pitfalls for Your Gut Health
Clinicians have long understood the immense impact the health of your gut has on things like weight, energy, depression, autoimmunity and more. With the recent boom in microbiota research we have learned much more about this connection. Like never before we understand how we can alleviate chronic health conditions and enhance well-being through improving the health of the gut.

However, with this boom has also come over speculation and ill-informed recommendations. This is very important because todays healthcare professional or consumer could unintentionally do harm. For example did you know by replicating the microbiota of African’s we could make a westerner bloated, constipated and overweight? 

This presentation will blend academic microbiota research with clinical research on digestive health. This will provide clinically relevant and evolutionarily sound recommendations for achieving optimum well-being via improving the health of your gut. 

Presenters
avatar for Michael Ruscio

Michael Ruscio

DC, DrRuscio.com
Michael Ruscio is a doctor, clinical researcher, author, and health enthusiast. Dr. Ruscio practices Functional Medicine and is currently performing two clinical trials in the treatment of digestive conditions. He is also writing a book on the microbiota. Dr. Ruscio gives smart, busy... Read More →


Saturday August 13, 2016 10:40am - 11:20am MDT
West

11:30am MDT

Feeding Your Microbiome for Optimal Health
The microbiome is an important contributor to the health and vitality of the individual. This talk will review compare the analyses of the microbiomes and diets of hunter-gatherers, subsistence farmers and urban dwellers. It will then review strategies to increase the diversity of species residing in the gut.

Presenters
avatar for Terry Wahls

Terry Wahls

MD
Terry Wahls, M.D., is a clinical professor of medicine at the University of Iowa and Director of the Therapeutic Lifestyle Clinic at the Iowa City Veteran Affairs Health Care System She also conducts clinical trials that test the efficacy of dietary and lifestyle interventions in... Read More →


Saturday August 13, 2016 11:30am - 12:10pm MDT
West

1:50pm MDT

Bad Diet, Bad DNA? Are epigenetic and sequence mutations redefining the human race?
Recently, statistics reveal a startling trend of increased rates of child brain development disorders diagnosed over the past several decades. The anti-vaccine community has long suggested a link between environment and autism, yet few investigations have been launched into potential dietary factors. What's more, increasing evidence points to epigenetic and genetic changes playing a significant role in autism and other developmental disorders. This begs the question, if several genetically influenced disorders are on the rise, could it be that environmental factors are changing us at a genetic level in ways that impair brain function and, in so doing, redefine the nature of being human? This literature review investigates that question by presenting evidence of a potential link between recent dietary trends that lower nutrient intensity and increase oxidative stress and detrimental gene changes that appear to impact brain development.

Presenters
avatar for Cate Shanahan

Cate Shanahan

MD
Trained in biochemistry and genetics at Cornell before entering medical school, Dr Cate recognized pharmaceutical intervention did nothing to heal the underlying metabolic issues her Family Medicine patients in Hawaii were dealing with. Applying her knowledge of biochemistry... Read More →


Saturday August 13, 2016 1:50pm - 2:30pm MDT
West

4:10pm MDT

Get Up, Stand Up: A Brief History of Sedentarism and Why Movement is Good Medicine
Chairs first emerged in prehistoric times as a way for high-status individuals to designate their social standing, and their use was almost exclusively the domain of the affluent class until the Industrial Revolution made affordable, mass-produced seating possible. Prior to this point, the vast majority of people sat on improvised objects such as beds, tree stumps, or benches, or simply squatted on their haunches. Social aspirations, continued technological innovations (e.g. the automobile), and a shift towards sedentary work drove the adoption of the chair until its use became ubiquitous at home, at work, at school, and at play (e.g. computer and video games). The average American now spends more than 10 hours a day seated, but excessive sitting is not without consequence. There is a growing body of scientific research that suggests that spending too much time seated is a contributing factor in the development of obesity, cardiovascular disease, orthopedic issues, and even cancer. In other words, chairs, and the sedentary behavior their presence promotes, represents an evolutionary mismatch similar to that of fast food, and in this presentation it will be proposed that exposing the body to a variety of movement patterns throughout the day (i.e. movement breaks) is an effective countermeasure to prolonged sitting and an effective way to reduce the risk of chronic disease.

Presenters
avatar for Tony Federico

Tony Federico

BSc
Tony Federico is the VP of Marketing for Natural Force Nutrition Inc. (https://www.naturalforce.com), is an Editor for the Journal of Evolution and Health, a long time contributor to Paleo Magazine, a Paleo f(x) and AHS Alum, a 10 veteran of the fitness industry, and the author “Paleo Grilling: A Modern Caveman’s Guide to Cooking with Fire”. As a young man, he experience... Read More →


Saturday August 13, 2016 4:10pm - 4:50pm MDT
West